Recent blog posts

Andrew Joscelyne Thursday, 14 September 2017 in Translation '22

Adolfo Hernandez: From People to Data Driven

Captains of the Translation Industry Talk About the Single Biggest Thing They've Learnt

 

TAUS spoke with Adolfo Hernandez, the CEO of SDL, about what he had learnt from his first 18 months in his position. Adolfo is probably the captain of the translation industry with one of the shortest C-suite tenures. The theme of the conversation was:

"What is the single biggest lesson that you have learnt about the translation industry?"

 

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Jaap van der Meer Thursday, 14 September 2017 in Translation '22

Locamaniacs Versus Globaloneys

The translation industry is experiencing a most exciting time of opportunities. In my previous article - The Story of the Translation Industry in 22 - I described ten different innovation themes with an inside-outward looking perspective. In this article I take a view from the outside observing sentiments that could dampen the growth and opportunity curve of the translation industry. Political fashions seem to be leaning more towards protectionism. Companies tend to think that they are more globalized than they in fact are, and find that they are spending enough on localization. The art of localization is to exploit the differences in cultures rather than simplifying them to global standards. We knew that, but do we really practice it? Now more than ever, stakeholders in the translation industry need to be firm about their mission and the unique role they have in their companies’ and clients’ globalization strategies. They need to be “locamaniacs”.

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Andrew Joscelyne Wednesday, 16 August 2017 in Translation '22

Rory Cowan: Getting the Pace Right

Captains of the Translation Industry Talk About the Single Biggest Thing They've Learnt

Rory Cowan, founder of Lionbridge, is stepping down this year after 21 years as a highly successful CEO and moving into the role of Chairman. To kick off a new series of interviews with major figures in the translation/language services industry, TAUS wanted to find out the one big thing that Rory has learnt as head of the world’s largest language service provider. He responded with a veritable master class on how industries evolve, and how market participants can anticipate the timing, magnitude and impact of major industry changes.

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Jaap van der Meer Tuesday, 18 April 2017 in Translation '22

The Story of the Translation Industry in ‘22

On March 22-24 (2017), fifty people came together in a former clandestine church in Amsterdam to break their heads on the question how the translation industry will have changed in 2022. The story that came out can be read as an ordinary battle between man and machine, with a victory for the latter. But at a deeper layer, there is a fascinating intrigue with many threads about game-changing technologies and trends and an outcome that is perplexing even for all of us who think that they are behind the wheel today. Be careful what you wish for.

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Jaap van der Meer Thursday, 14 July 2016 in Translation '22

A To-Do List for the Translation Industry

It was Renato (Beninatto) who reminded me, in the ‘Future’ panel discussion in Dublin, that only eleven years ago (when the TAUS think tank was founded) nobody - in his right mind - would think about using machine translation (MT) technology on any job anywhere. And now? Now MT is everywhere. Insiders say that everyday computers translate 200 Billion words. That is 100 times more than the output of all human translators together. MT is everywhere and always there, except … well, except the professionals seem to have their doubts. That makes me think that the state of the industry could be better.

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Jaap van der Meer Wednesday, 24 February 2016 in Translation '22

The Future Does Not Need Translators*

* The title is borrowed from an article written by Bill Joy (then Chief Scientist at Sun Microsystems) and published in Wired Magazine in April 2000. (Why the future does not need us). This article was somewhat gloomy, giving us a warning about a future in which machines essentially dominate us, humans. “We must do more thinking up front if we are not to be (…) surprised and shocked by the consequences of our inventions.” Projecting this fundamental and existential problem on our own sector, the field of translation, could easily lead to depressing and devastating visions of the translation industry in the coming decades, and as a result put us – everyone working in this industry – in a defensive and reactive or inactive state of mind. What we much rather do is be realistic about it, have an open mind about both the upsides and the downsides. The future may not need us, but we certainly need a future.

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Nick Lambson Tuesday, 17 November 2015 in Translation '22

The Innovator’s Dilemma

The translation industry is growing, but not fast enough! The amount of content published every day vastly exceeds the amount that can be translated by the few hundred thousand translators in today’s workforce. Machine translation seems to be a part of the solution, yet the world is still waiting for this technology to mature. How do we scale up the translation industry’s capacity for the massive potential opportunity?

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Jaap van der Meer Tuesday, 07 July 2015 in Translation '22

No Government, No Innovation

The translation industry is quickly becoming a high-tech industry. So we say…  But fear not. Translators' jobs are not going away. Although Google Translate may be considered a big innovation, the company keeps hunting for more and better human translators who can produce the most readable and best localizations of its products.

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Jaap van der Meer Thursday, 19 February 2015 in TAUS Events, in Translation '22

The Brains but not the Guts: Why American companies crack the language barrier and Europe fails

After decades of funding of European research in language and translation technology, the new European Commission wants to turn off the money tap. European researchers are staggering and they wonder why. One theory is that the politicians feel it is money wasted. Despite a diligent European investment program in machine translation, US corporations seem to have won that battle.

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